Tinnitus Remedies

Hearing aids

Most people develop tinnitus as a symptom of hearing loss. When you lose hearing, your brain undergoes changes in the way it processes sound frequencies. A hearing aid is a small electronic device that uses a microphone, amplifier, and speaker to increase the volume of external noises. This can mollify neuroplastic changes in the brain’s ability to process sound.

If you have tinnitus, you may find that the better you hear, the less you notice your tinnitus. A 2007 survey of healthcare providers published in The Hearing Review, found that roughly 60 percent of people with tinnitus experienced at least some relief from a hearing aid. Roughly 22 percent found significant relief.

 Sound-masking devices

Sound-masking devices provide a pleasant or benign external noise that partially drowns out the internal sound of tinnitus. The traditional sound-masking device is a tabletop sound machine, but there are also small electronic devices that fit in the ear. These devices can play white noise, pink noise, nature noises, music, or other ambient sounds. Most people prefer a level of external sound that is just slightly louder than their tinnitus, but others prefer a masking sound that completely drowns out the ringing.

Some people use commercial sound machines designed to help people relax or fall asleep. You can also use headphones, television, music, or even a fan.

A 2017 study in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience found that masking was most effective when using broadband noise, such as white noise or pink noise. Nature sounds proved much less effective.

 Modified or customized sound machines

Standard masking devices help to mask the sound of tinnitus while you are using them, but they have no long-lasting effects. Modern medical-grade devices use customized sounds tailored specifically to your tinnitus. Unlike regular sound machines, these devices are only worn intermittently. You may experience benefits long after the device is turned off, and over time, you may experience long-term improvement in the perceived loudness of your tinnitus.

 Behavioral therapy

Tinnitus is associated with a high level of emotional stress. Depression, anxiety, and insomnia are not uncommon in people with tinnitus. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a type of talk therapy that helps people with tinnitus learn to live with their condition. Rather than reducing the sound itself, CBT teaches you how to accept it. The goal is to improve your quality of life and prevent tinnitus from driving you crazy.

CBT involves working with a therapist or counselor, typically once per week, to identify and change negative thought patterns. CBT was initially developed as a treatment for depression and other psychological problems, but it seems to work well for people with tinnitus. Several studies and meta-reviews, including one published in the Korean Journal of Audiology, have found that CBT significantly improves irritation and annoyance that often comes with tinnitus.

 Progressive tinnitus management

Progressive tinnitus management (PTM) is a therapeutic treatment program offered by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Tinnitus is one of the most common disabilities seen in veterans of the armed services. The loud noises of war (and training) often lead to noise-induced hearing loss.

If you’re a veteran, talk to your local VA hospital about their tinnitus treatment programs. You may want to consult the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR) at the VA. They have a step-by-step tinnitus workbook and educational materials that may be helpful.

 Exercise

Exercise contributes significantly to your overall well-being. Tinnitus can be aggravated by stress, depression, anxiety, lack of sleep, and illness. Regular exercise will help you manage stress, sleep better, and stay healthier.

altered perceptions of their tinnitus. This included a reduction in depression and anxiety.

DIY mindfulness meditation

You don’t need to enroll in an eight-week program to get started with mindfulness training. Participants in the MBTSR program all received a copy of the groundbreaking book “Full Catastrophe Living” by Jon Kabat-Zinn. Kabat-Zinn’s book is the premier manual for practicing mindfulness in daily life. You will learn about, and be encouraged to practice, meditation and breathing techniques that can help draw your focus away from tinnitus.

 Alternative treatments

There are several alternative or complementary tinnitus treatment options, including:

  • nutritional supplements
  • homeopathic remedies
  • acupuncture
  • hypnosis

None of these treatment options are supported by science. Many people are convinced that the herb gingko biloba is helpful, however large-scale studies have been unable to prove this. There are many nutritional supplements claiming to be tinnitus remedies. These are usually a combination of herbs and vitamins, often including zinc, ginkgo, and vitamin B-12.

These dietary supplements have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not supported by scientific research. However, anecdotal reports suggest that they may help some people.

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